Solzhenitsyn’s Third Way

From what little I have read of, and from, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, he appears a highly acclaimed yet highly divisive character. He reminds me somewhat of Slavoj Zizek in the way that he cannot be pigeon-holed into one political school, and attacks aspects of both the left and the right within politics itself.

Solzhenitsyn’s masterpiece Cancer Ward is a wonderfully poetic critique of the Communist Soviet Union. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, and the further I progressed into the book, the deeper my appreciation grew for it.

One of the joys of reading great books are the different meanings and interpretations an individual can take from the text. What the book says to one person, may not reach the ears of another. Truly great books do not just tell a story through the words, and on the written lines, but they tell a story between the lines. The interpretation of words and phrases, the literary techniques in certain passages, the decision for the author to use a certain manner of speaking. There is a story within the story.

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