Monotonous, Repetitive Failures – We Need To Change The Way We Protest In 21st Century Britain

In 2011, during my second year of university, Time Magazine chose The Protester as their Person of the Year.

On the one hand this is a great cause for celebration as the millions of individuals committed to the struggle were, in some way, rewarded for their actions. The hours of work, the days of organisation, the minor victories; whatever it was, their efforts were now recognised, and praised, on a global stage.

One of the reasons given by Kurt Anderson of Time Magazine for choosing their Person of the Year as The Protester, was because protest had once again become “fashionable”. (So long as it was being conducted in the MENA region and toppling dictators).

But this representation of “the protester” did not sit well with me. No protester wants to be on the cover of Time Magazine, and if they do it would be for the wrong reasons.

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The Rebirth of 4-4-2

If Leicester City’s irresistible charge towards the title tells us anything, it is that 4-4-2 is back.

Despite Claudio Ranieri downplaying the chances of his team ending the season as champions, they are certainly in the driving seat now. A win against Arsenal will only further enhance their credentials, and would surely see them become favourites.

Playing a brand of football that the Premier League has rarely seen in the last decade, Ranieri and co have been propelled to the top of the table, a position even more extraordinary considering that just 12-months before they were battling relegation.

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