Venezuela’s Exodus

The northern Brazilian city of Boa Vista must have the cleanest car windscreens in the entire country. This is because on almost every street corner, at every junction, and around every roundabout, there is a Venezuelan, or four, offering their services. Their partners and children sheltering from the sun in some nearby shade.

Whether they were teachers, builders, doctors, carpenters, chefs, farmers, bankers, or shop assistants previously, they are now self-employed car washers and roadside salespeople. Cardboard signs serve the dual purpose of promoting their work and potential, whilst also providing some cover from the intense heat which accompanies their daily 12-hour shifts.

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The Levant War: 2011 – ?

The Syrian revolution now has to be seen as part of a wider conflict in the region. There is no use just talking about the revolution and the subsequent outbreak of civil war, and then viewing the Turkish-Kurdish war as a separate event, as well as the international effort against ISIS as something different again. All of them are interlinked and overlap.

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Prison Inc: An Interview With The Maker of Injustice – A Film About Prisons and Crime In 21st Century Neoliberal UK

As plans are unveiled for four more prisons in the UK – creating “up to 10,000 modern prison places by 2020” – and as the prison population, suicide in inmates, abuse, mental health problems, and rioting are all reaching record levels, surely it is time to reevaluate our methods of “serving justice”.

Appalled both by the way that our society is treating its convicted criminals, and by the silence and lack of solidarity on all sides of the political spectrum, one radical film-maker is seeking to spark debate and shed some much needed light on an issue we have all too happily turned our backs on.

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The View From The Roof Of The World: Observations From Five Days In Chinese Occupied Tibet

In February 2017, I had the privilege of being able to visit Lhasa, the capital of Tibet – or the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region, as the Chinese have called it.

At an altitude of approximately 3,500 metres, it is one of the highest cities in the world, and takes some getting used to upon arrival. At it’s summit, the imposing, but elegant Potala Palace, which is situated in the centre of the city, stands over 4km above sea level, and is one of the highest points that I have ever been on foot. The monasteries and temples dotted among the hills that surround the city give the opportunity to go even higher.

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The UK National Debt: Why It’s A Problem And How To Tackle It

The UK national debt is a ball and chain around the ankle of our society currently. It is an unnecessary burden which will be passed on to future generations, and I believe that the time has come to put aside party politics aside and agree to a long-term plan of debt elimination.

The recent tweet by Conservative MP Daniel Kawczynski (see below), highlighted three things for me. Firstly, it demonstrated the sheer idiocy of some of our elected representatives; secondly it showed just how far the buck-passing, playground bickering blame-game has embedded itself in Westminster culture; and thirdly, and most importantly, it also showed the extent to which the UK is saddled with enormous debt.

Amongst the retweets and the laughing, it is easy to forget that the topic of the tweet is where the importance lies, not in the ill-judged tweet itself. The growing national debt is a serious issue and it needs addressing.

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